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14 Winter Vegetables You Can Grow For Food Storage

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14 Winter Vegetables You Can Grow For Food Storage

14 Winter Vegetables You Can Grow For Food Storage

When winter comes, it is a time of cold wind and frost. Most people avoid sowing their seed in this period because they think it isn’t a suitable season for crops. However, there are some great vegetables that can grow well in this cold temperature to give gardeners fresh garden produce. And the article we’ve listed the 14 Winter Vegetables that are perfect for food storage without any processing.
14 Winter Vegetables You Can Grow For Food Storage
There are many vegetables that can be stored include many fall harvested root crops, pumpkins, and winter squash, or fruits ideal for storage such as apples and pears known for their storage capabilities. You can totally store your vegetables and fruits for a long time in natural methods as long as you have a storage area that is relatively cool and stays above freezing. So, keep reading to explore and test it out to see which crops will work and how long they last in your unique storage conditions.

#1 Turnips

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Source: Hgvt

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After trim turnip tops to 1-inch and brushing off excess soil, you can store turnips in boxes or totes packed with damp sand or sawdust for about 3 to 5 months. The ideal storage condition is from 32-35 Fahrenheit with 90% relative humidity. Besides, you need to check sand or sawdust frequently and re-moisten as needed to keep it damp.

#2 Cabbage

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Source: Gardeningknowhow

To store Cabbage in the long time which is 3-4 months, let’s keep roots attached and wrap them in newspaper and store them in crates, or sit roots in a bucket of moist sand. The temperature of 32 to 40 Fahrenheit and 80-90% relative humidity are great conditions.

#3 Winter Radishes

Source: Okrainmygarden

Winter Radishes can be lasted up to 2 to 4 months when getting a suitable condition including the temperature of 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90 relative humidity.

#4 Potatoes

Source: Mother-nature

Potatoes have different storages depending on the type. Before starting, let’s cure unwashed potatoes before storing them so the skins heal over and thicken up. Then, store them in a dark area in covered boxes or bins with some holes for ventilation at 32-40 Fahrenheit and 80-90% relative humidity. This will last your potatoes keep fresh from 4-9 months.

#5 Beets

Source: Harvesttotable

To store Beets in 5 months, you should trim tops and taproot to 1-inch firstly, then Brush off loose soil, but do not wash. Put them in buckets, boxes, or totes packed with damp sand or sawdust at a temperature of 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90% relative humidity.

#6 Apples and Pears

Source: Npr

To store these fruits for the long term, air circulation plays an important role. Firstly, package your fruits in a sheet of newspaper or nestle them in shredded paper to help them breathe as well as do not touch. Then store in well-ventilated boxes or crates at a temperature of 32-40 Fahrenheit and 80-90% relative humidity. This will store them fresh last up to 2-6 months depending on the variety. In addition, you should sort through frequently and remove any soft or rotten fruit.

#7 Garlic

Source: Gardenerspath

Garlic can be lasted up to 6 months in storage at a temperature of 32-50 Fahrenheit in a dry area with a relative humidity of 50-60%.

#8 Parsnips

Source: Rhs

To keep Parsnips from 3 to 5 months in storage, you should foliage, brush off excess soil, and sort by size. Layer the parsnips in sand or sawdust in a box or tote, beginning with the largest ones on the bottom so you can use up the smaller ones first. The ideal condition is 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90% humidity.

#9 Pumpkin

Source: Kellogggarden

You can store fresh Pumpkins for about 10 days at 80-85 Fahrenheit. When harvested fully ripe with at least 1-inch of stem for storing, these pumpkins will be stored a long time (for several months) at a temperature of 50-55 Fahrenheit and 50-70% humidity.

#10 Onions

Source: Safiorganics

Before storing, your onions need to be cured and dried by spreading them out in a single layer in a dark, cool, and dry location with good airflow. Then trim tops to 1-inch and store loosely in baskets or mesh bags in a cool, dark, and dry location for winter at a temperature of 32-50 Fahrenheit in a dry area with a relative humidity of 50-60%. This will keep your onions fresh in 6 months at least depending on the type.

#11 Carrots

Source: Hgvt

Carrots can be stored for a long time for about 4- 6 months at a temperature of 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90% humidity. Before storing, trim tops, brush off excess soil, and sort by size. Then, layer the carrots in damp sand or sawdust in a box or tote beginning with the largest ones on the bottom so you can use up the smaller ones first. Finally, cover each layer of carrots with about 1/4-inch of sand or sawdust and add a final layer of 2-inches on top.

#12 Winter Squash

Source: Treehugger

To store Winter Squash for the longest time which lasts up to 6 months, depending on the type, you should take two processes. Firstly, choose mature winter squash with at least 1-inch of stem and cure at 80-85 Fahrenheit for about 10 days to allow the rinds to thicken. After that store cured winter squash in an area that is dry, cool, and well ventilated at a temperature of 50-55 Fahrenheit and 50-70% humidity.

#13 Rutabagas

Source: Gardenerspath

Rutabagas can be kept the best tase and fresh for about 2 to 4 months if placed at a temperature of 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90% humidity. Before storing, you should do some steps. Firstly, trim tops and taproot to 1-inch. Next, brush off loose soil, but do not wash. Finally, store rutabagas in buckets or totes packed with damp sand or sawdust. Besides, this fruit dries out easily, so check sand frequently and re-moisten if needed.

#14 Celeriac

Source: Yates

You can store Celeriac for a long time about 2 to 4 months if you place it in at a temperature of 32-35 Fahrenheit and 90% relative humidity. Before keeping, you need to trim tops and gnarly roots to 1-inch. Shake off loose soil, but do not wash. And then, store t in buckets or totes packed with damp sand or sawdust.




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